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If a book is not worth reading twice, it is not worth reading once

-- Probably someone on Twitter

This is a list of books I've read and consider worth reading a second time. The links are affiliate links.

Principles: Life and Work

Principles: Life and Work

by Ray Dalio

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

by Walter Isaacson

It's hard to grasp the nature of a person. Their character, their ups and downs, and their adventures. This book, however, excels at portraiting Steve Jobs' life in every possible way.

It is a journey, which beams you in the position of a bystander of each significant moment. Reading this book rallies the experience of remembering the past, with short snapshots, like a slide show. The only difference: The main character isn't you. It's one of the most iconic, genius, disruptive, and emotion wrenching people who maybe ever lived.

The Art of Thinking Clearly

The Art of Thinking Clearly

by Rolf Dobelli

The Art of the Good Life

The Art of the Good Life

by Rolf Dobelli

Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow

by Daniel Kahneman

This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See

This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See

by Seth Godin

A down to earth guide about the fundamental mindset of marketing. The book is written very universally. Instead of suggesting a lot of specific "marketing hacks", it focuses to teach you the mentality, hoping that specific ideas will arise from it instead of the other way around.

Company of One: Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for Business

Company of One: Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for Business

by Paul Jarvis

After reading this masterpiece, I realized that I have been brainwashed into megalomania for my whole life (at least I like to think so). But Paul Jarvis manages to introduce you to a different world. A world, which offers calmness throughout your entrepreneurial journey, where goals are reachable, and businesses manageable. A world where not everybody has to be the next Mark Zuckerberg or Steve Jobs.

The book guides the reader through a lot of small business examples. It does a great job explaining that growing a business for the sake of growing it isn't an as valid approach as you might think. The big lesson: Stay small and only expand if there is an actual need.

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